April 12th, 2017

#5534: Tell it like it is, not how you'd like it to be.

I agree: "Fearless Girl" is stupid. Look here: if you're a 10-year-old girl, and you're faced with an enraged animal that weighs thousands of pounds, and you're just standing there in a defiant pose, you are stupid rather than "fearless".
Don’t care how "fearless" she is, about half a second later in that movie a multi-ton bull straight out of Greek myth is going to gore her and stomp her shattered remains into the dirt. The girl's parents are clearly guilty of an insane level of child endangerment for letting her get into that situation, and for not teaching her any damn sense. The "Fearless Girl" statue has a plaque that yammers something about "Women in leadership." But the only "woman" on display is a small child who seemingly doesn't understand the situation and is about to die.
That about sums it up.

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John C. Wright links to an article which seems to nicely encapsulate
The state of sporting events in postmodern post rational America: Boy Identifies as Girl, Boy Competes as Girl, Boy Wins Everything.

I am not making this up. I could not make up anything this wildly improbable. I am only a science fiction writer after all.
So, let's look at the article he links.

Big surprise: boy allowed to compete in girls' athletics wins. Autoplay warning.
With family, friends and teammates cheering [him] on at [his] first high school track meet, Andraya won the girls 100- and 200-meter dashes, and helped [his] 4x100-meter relay team take second place. [He] ran 11.99 seconds in the 100 and 26.34 in the 200.
Pronouns corrected to match reality.

For fuck's sake, the kid has a mustache. Look further down in the article and you see the masculine musculature and features.

Oh, and here's the caption for that picture, again with pronouns corrected to match reality, except for his mother's quoted statement:
Andrea Yearwood rests on [his] mother's arm after winning the 200 meter dash during [his] first track meet as a transgender female. "For me," said Yearwood's mother, Ngozi Nnaji, "The decision to be supportive was easy because she can be whoever she wants to be. But what she won't be is suicidal. She won't be an addict. She won't be dependent on other ways to make her feel good. She needs to be herself. And if that means I support her in her transition to a transgender female, then that's what I do as a parent."
"What she won't be is suicidal. She won't be an addict."

Like hell, lady. Have you seen the suicide and drug use statistics for transsexuals? They're not pretty.

And I liked this:
Andraya's times in the 100 and the 200 are fast. A year ago, her 11.99 in the 100 would have won the Class M title and put her second at the State Open, .01 seconds behind the winning time. And Andraya ran Wednesday in cold conditions, and without starting blocks. She is expected to get faster.

"I know they'll say it is unfair and not right, but my counter to that is: Why not?" her mother said. "She is competing and practicing and giving her all and performing and excelling based on her skills. Let that be enough. Let her do that, and be proud of that."
I'll tell you why it's not fair: it's unfair because your kid is biologically male and he is competing against other kids who are biologically female, and it's a matter of biological fact that men are stronger and faster than women, ie naturally more athletic, than women are. That's why we have to divide athletics into mens' and womens' sports; if we didn't, women would never win.

Scroll down a way to the last picture in the story. It shows the kid standing with a couple of his teammates. Compare his arms and legs to those of the girls on the team. Those big masculine muscles give him a natural, physical advantage over the girls he competes against. How he identifies--the pronouns he chooses to use for himself--don't change the physical reality.

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"President Trump re-accomodated a Syrian air base". I like that.

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From last night's AoSHQ ONT: "Has anyone ever said, 'I wish I could go to more meetings today'? Matt Mullenweg"

Yes. Anyone who's ever worked in a call center.

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United Airlines has more Newspeak to offer than just "re-accomodating". I especially like number 10, "Unscheduled Equipment Retirement". That means "crash".

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Last night Mrs. Fungus and I finished watching Rome for the second time. Funny thing: we have it on DVD, but we just watched it from the on-demand service. Why futz around with DVDs when you don't have to?

It's such an entertaining show, and historically accurate enough that I don't get annoyed by stupid crap. The Roman Empire was a highly sophisticated society, and people back then were just as political and venal as they are now. Very little has changed about human society since then.

I have one--one--complaint about it. There is a scene where someone says, "Rome is a very complicated machine." I don't know that the ancient Romans had the concept of "complex machinery", not at a time when the most complex machine you could find was a winch or a pump. But, then again, let's not forget the Antikythera mechanism, which existed about 200 years before setting in which the character in the series uttered the line. So, perhaps not all that anachronistic after all.

(Side note: to my surprise, I typed that name correctly from memory.)

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The Nasacort seems to be helping. The retronasal swelling seems to have gone down; I also don't seem to be snoring like an army of lumberjacks clearcutting the Amazon Jungle and grinding it all to mulch using implements powered with very large engines with no mufflers. While hosting a Disaster Area revival.
Disaster Area was a plutonium rock band from the Gagrakacka Mind Zones and was generally regarded as not only the loudest rock band in the Galaxy, but also as being the loudest noise of any kind at all. Regular concert goers judged that the best sound balance was usually to be heard from within large concrete bunkers some thirty-seven miles away from the stage, whilst the musicians themselves played their instruments by remote control from within a heavily insulated spaceship which stayed in orbit around the planet--or more frequently around a completely different planet.
Thank you, Douglas Adams.

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Well, guess what I have to do? I have to start thinking about getting the grass cut. It's that time of year!

*sigh*