atomic_fungus (atomic_fungus) wrote,
atomic_fungus
atomic_fungus

#1827: Bugs gone

I downloaded and installed A2 Anti-Malware and it found the guck on my machine and eradicated it.

...at least, I think it did. Web pages load properly (and quickly) and everything looks good--and it's no longer popping up extraneous invisible copies of Internet Explorer--but I can't rerun the scan. If I try using the software again nothing happens.

The last time I got a trojan (August, I think it was) I had to manually remove the thing myself; this program did it automatically after a reboot. Not too shabby.

So I think I want to register the software and pay my way out of the 30-day trial period, but I can't get the software to run so as to find out how to do it. WTF.

Maybe after another reboot.

* * *

Here the Anchoress links some videos. The title of the post is "H1N1 Vaccine Contaminated?"

It's a series of videos by and of a nun who was a physician before she became a nun. I watched about half of the second video, and it scares the everlovin' stuffing out of me.

Having seen this video, I am going to avoid the H1N1 vaccine like the plague, and I'm going to insist that Mom do the same. Jesus.

Let me do what the Anchoress does not: summarize what's in the first five videos (out of the total six) the first three of which she has embedded in her post.

Earlier this year, Baxter Pharmaceutical sent a batch of vaccine out for distribution in Europe, and the vaccine apparently contained a mix of H1N1 and avian flu virus. Furthermore, the virus had not been weakened as it normally is in vaccines, so anyone getting a shot of that "vaccine" would have developed full-on flu symptoms in a matter of days. The only reason we didn't read about a major flu outbreak in eastern Europe because a lab tech in Czechloslovakia decided to test the virus on a series of lab animals, all of which died. He raised the alarm, and the vaccine was recalled.

Where were the news stories?

The Sister then goes on to explain that the World Health Organization declared this a top-level pandemic in June, and she mentions something I've seen all over the Internet since then: H1N1 has a lower fatality rate than the annual flu does. Why did WHO declare such an emergency for a virus that doesn't even kill as many people as the regularly-occurring annual flu? "How come there isn't a pandemic every year?" she asks.

About 1:30 in the third video we learn that the WHO guidelines for determining H1N1 infection don't require an actual test. Like AIDS in Africa, if someone shows the symptoms, they get the diagnosis. (This is why we don't know how many people in Africa actually have AIDS: tuberculosis is diagnosed "AIDS", cholera is diagnosed "AIDS", typhoid is diagnosed "AIDS", and so on. They're doing the same thing with H1N1: diarrhea, nausea, headache, joint pain, fever, etc mean "H1N1".)

Halfway through #3 she starts to talk about things which we saw (which I commented on here, too, in fact) surrounding the H1N1 scare: Massachusetts considering fining people $1,000 per day for refusing the vaccine, Iowa talking about quarantines, and so on. This is where I begin to be concerned, because I remember these things and she places them in an interesting context.

Video #4: the vaccine will have side effects, and some of those side effects can be severe, including paralysis. The prevention can potentially be much worse than the disease.

...and the contracts are apparently set up so that the pharmaceutical companies are absolved of liability. If you end up paralyzed because of the vaccine, you can't sue. Obama's Secretary of Health and Human Services, Kathleen Sibelius, signed the document. "Big Pharma" has received official absolution from the United States government.

Again: Where are the news stories?

#5: the "swine flu" virus hasn't mutated in 70 years. Suddenly we're worried about it mutating; as it stands now the H1N1 virus is less lethal than the regular annual flu virus, which itself isn't very dangerous. The benefits of the H1N1 vaccine are outweighed by the potential risks of taking it (side effects, etc).

If people start dying, either the virus has mutated--in which case the vaccine won't work--or else it's a different virus entirely, in which case the vaccine won't work.

* * *

I think that's a good way to decide whether or not to get a vaccination; and the Sister's discussion allowed me to formulate my inchoate thoughts--my gut reaction, as it were--more concretely.

There are certain diseases which have dire consequences. Polio's the perfect example; smallpox is another. We figured out how to make vaccines because of diseases like them, because if they don't kill you they leave you crippled. The risks of injecting a foreign organism into your blood (possibly mixed with something that winds up your immune system beyond its normal levels) are far outweighed by the benefits.

(How often have you heard the term "iron lung" used lately? Smallpox is all but extinct. How many polio cases have been reported?)

But when the consequences of the disease are that you might (only "might") have to spend a couple days at home and in bed, a vaccine really isn't warranted, is it? An employer will want you to take that vaccine, in order to avoid the potential for lost time, but from a "health and well being" standpoint it's not necessary and can, in fact, be counterproductive: I had a flu shot once. I got sicker than a dog right afterward. Would I have gotten sick if I hadn't had the shot? Maybe. (Only "maybe".)

H1N1 isn't a serious disease, not in the United States. Its infection rate does not seem very high, and it's mortality rate is lower than the seasonal flu's is. Why vaccinate against that?

Because the government wants us to? No.

* * *

I don't know what's going on here:

epic fail pictures

It's definitely a "fail", though. Taking your anime "realdoll" out for hanami--how pathetic.

...do you know how much one of those things costs? Forget the "sex toy" part of it; a life-size, posable, non-fully-functional model of an anime character is spendy, as in "as much as a good used car" spendy.

Then the Japanese wonder why their birth rate is falling....
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